Canadian police warn that posting videos of alleged package thieves could be ‘violation’ of their privacy

by NEW YORK DIGITAL NEWS



Police in the Canadian province of Quebec warned citizens against posting surveillance footage of their packages being stolen because it could violate the “private life” of the alleged thieves. 

“Montreal West is known for its large porches, but around the holidays, those porches are a big target for thieves or ‘porch pirates,’” CTV News Montreal videojournalist Olivia O’Malley reported on Saturday.

“It’s something we deal with on a daily basis,” said Montreal West councilor responsible for public security Lauren Small-Pennefather.

“You have people that are following the vehicles, and when they see a parcel that’s dropped off, they then go and take the parcel if nobody comes to the door to retrieve the parcel,” Small-Pennefather told CTV. 

However, the province’s local police force, the Sûreté du Québec (SQ) warned local citizens against sharing footage of alleged porch thieves.

“You cannot post the images yourself because you have to remember, in Canada, we have a presumption of innocence and posting that picture could be a violation of private life,” SQ communications officer Lt. Benoit Richard warned.

Canadian Police Officer Lt. Benoit Richard warned that posting videos of alleged package thieves could be a violation of their privacy. Fox News
Individuals who disseminate pictures of a person without consent could face a variety of civil or criminal proceedings depending on the situation, Canadian Police said.

“If you get some proof that somebody might have stolen something, call the police, give that proof to the police,” he said.

“We’ll do the investigation, bring that person to justice and file some charges.”

People who post security footage of their packages being stolen could face potential defamation charges, according to CTV. 

The Sûreté du Québec sent Fox News Digital an email which pointed to articles 35 and 36 of the Civil Code of Québec, which state “every person has a right to the respect of his reputation and privacy,” and that “the privacy of a person may not be invaded without the consent of the person or without the invasion being authorized by law.” 

People who post security footage of their packages being stolen could face potential defamation charges in Canada. YonkersPD

They also said individuals who disseminate pictures of a person without consent could face a variety of civil or criminal proceedings depending on the situation. 

The comments from the law enforcement officer sparked backlash and disbelief that Canadians could face legal trouble for posting home security footage of their packages being stolen. 

“It’s 2024, so of course the police care more about criminals than victims of crime,” Canadian journalist Ezra Levant wrote.

“The Quebec police are saying this because it embarrasses them in how much theft occurs without consequence,” conservative commentator Chris Tomlinson wrote.

“Report it to them, and they’ll file it away and pretend it never happened.”

“The world has gone mad,” author and host of YouTube’s The Factual Feminist, Christina Hoff Sommers wrote.



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